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Kiron Reid: Personal and Political webpages

Kiron Reid

Kiron Reid is a Liberal activist, writer and campaigner in support of civil liberties, the environment and an inclusive, tolerant society. He is a committed internationalist and pro-European. He has written extensively about Liberalism, most often in the British Liberal magazine "Liberator". Kiron spent many years actively campaigning for the Liberal Democrats, and since 2007 has focused more on non-party political campaigns and international work. Professionally he was a Lecturer in Law at the University of Liverpool for many years and is now an Honorary Research Fellow. His work has been published in leading law journals.

He supports international development and cooperation; and non-party / cross-party cooperation on matters of shared principles.

Learn more about Kiron

Recent updates

  • Document: Dec 15, 2014
    53.5 KiB text or word processing document

    Including:

    (1) Introduction to students on Lawyers' Day at Zaporizhia National University, 8 October 2014.

    (2) Introduction to students in the Faculty of Journalism at Zaporizhia National University, 16 October 2014.

    (3) Introduction to the English and Welsh criminal justice system. Law Speaking Club in the Faculty of Law at Zaporizhia National University, 16 October 2014.

    (4) The Plain English Campaign.

    Talk on Plain English to the Foreign Philology in the 21st Century conference, 17 October 2014.

    (5) The Scottish Independence Referendum, 18 September 2014. Smaller file.

    (6) The Scottish Independence Referendum, 18 September 2014.

    Presentation to teachers of English in Zaporozhia region, 23 October 2014.

    (7) Training of lawyers in England. Shorter version.

    (8) Training of lawyers in England and Wales.

    Questions posed by the Masters students of the Faculty of Law at ZNU.

    Seminar co-delivered with Frances Willmott.

    (9) Patriotic Education Conference, Zaporozhia Oblast. 28 November 2014.

    National values and education in the UK.

    (10) Visit to the European Union institutions.

    (11) Websites for student and lecturer reference, ZNU November 2014.

    Including a selection of:

    UK Health sites.

    General information including education.

    (the Government, and Parliament websites)

    Some Law sites.

    And a diagram of the Court structure in England and Wales.

  • Document: Dec 15, 2014
    56 KiB text or word processing document

    Including a selection of:

    UK Health sites.

    General information including education.

    (the Government, and Parliament websites)

    Some Law sites.

    And a diagram of the Court structure in England and Wales.

  • Document: Dec 15, 2014
    59.5 KiB text or word processing document

    Notes from visits that were used as recent examples in discussing the importance of the EU with students. The Stronger Together campaign supported by the British Embassy in Ukraine was also mentioned frequently. Stronger Together campaign on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/StrongerTogetherUA

    A visit to the European Parliament Home Affairs Committee, 3 September 2014.

    The European Parliament display for tourists.

    A tourist visit to the European Commission.

  • Document: Dec 15, 2014
    62.5 KiB text or word processing document

    National values and education in the UK.

    The first page is my short biography, and summary of the talk (reproduced below).

    Pages 2 - 3 are the talk as I delivered it, but with a few paragraphs or lines highlighted in yellow, that I missed out to ensure that I stuck more closely to the time allocated.

    Pages 4 - 6 are a more detailed version of the talk, with some more explanation of points. At the end are a few web links to official information about England and Wales.

    Summary.

    This short talk will mostly be about the UK, but I am also interested in Ireland.

    I will mention six points.

    We do not have 'patriotic education' in the UK. Our education system does promote 'British values'. History is compulsory in primary schools (young children) and history and citizenship education are compulsory until the age of 14 (citizenship until 16). English language is compulsory till 16.

    Many people in the nations of the UK, England, Scotland and Wales are all patriotic for their countries. Irish people are proud of their heritage too. The situation is more complicated in Northern Ireland but everyone is proud of coming from their own land.

    Our armed forces have more widespread popular support than twenty years ago (I believe) because the army has been involved in long foreign conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. People support the soldiers and other personnel even though many opposed the Government policies.

    In Wales and Ireland, there has been a cultural revival of their ancient languages. Everyone in these countries speaks English, most speak English as their main language, but the Celtic languages are official languages along with English, used jointly in printed documents by government and can be used in the legal system.

    The problem of violence in Northern Ireland took much hard work by many brave people to end. When the war stops in the Donbass, in the future there will be some lessons that can be learnt from Northern Ireland.

    The recent cultural revival in Wales includes support for the language. This has been done in a positive way - it is not anti-English but is promoting the Welsh language as part of the unique history and culture of Wales. This is good for tourists and everyone.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    40.5 KiB text or word processing document

    Questions posed by the Masters students of the Faculty of Law at ZNU.

    Seminar co-delivered with Frances Willmott.

    This file is a more detailed set of my notes on training of lawyers in England and Wales. It contains more detail that may be of interest to the students, and to the Professors and Dean, of the Faculty of Law. Especially given about debates and proposals on reform of higher education, and of legal education, in Ukraine.

    The text includes a mixture of fact and my own personal opinion.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    33 KiB text or word processing document

    Questions posed by the Masters students of the Faculty of Law at ZNU.

    Seminar co-delivered with Frances Willmott.

    This is what I spoke about at the seminar.

    I agreed with the students that we will not talk about all of the set questions so then they could have the chance to ask practical legal questions to a real practicing English criminal barrister, Frances Willmott, of Linenhall Chambers, Chester. The other file is a more detailed set of these notes. It contains more detail that may be of interest to the students, and to the Professors and Dean, of the Faculty of Law.

    The text includes a mixture of fact and my own personal opinion.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    27.51 MiB text or word processing document

    Presentation to teachers of English in Zaporozhia region, 23 October 2014.

    A presentation and hopefully fun but informative discussion about both Scotland, and about the Independence Referendum. Including what I found that surprised me when I visited as an unofficial observer, and observations on the political implications of the No vote and the very large Yes vote.

    Note - very large attachment. It took a few minutes to upload even on our good broadband.

    This is a very large file because of a dozen photos. The text is also lengthy - although people interested can just glance at the headlines and key points, and look at any detail only if interested.

    It is the talk that I gave, written up with full notes, extra detail and illustrations. Plus references and links at the end. A few about Scotland, and more about general English links that may be interesting.

    I have also added a home task of things to look up about Scotland, though there are lots of particular points that the teachers may like more information about and that they can easily look up on the internet.

    I have more links to general English websites that I have put together that I post here as well.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    2.03 MiB text or word processing document

    Presentation to teachers of English in Zaporozhia region, 23 October 2014.

    This is the shorter version - without the pictures and with the key text. The references and notes at the end are still included. It should be quicker to download than the large file with pictures included and more detailed text.

    A presentation and hopefully fun but informative discussion about both Scotland, and about the Independence Referendum. Including what I found that surprised me when I visited as an unofficial observer, and observations on the political implications of the No vote and the very large Yes vote.

    This is a very large file because of a dozen photos. The text is also lengthy - although people interested can just glance at the headlines and key points, and look at any detail only if interested.

    I have also added a home task of things to look up about Scotland, though there are lots of particular points that the teachers may like more information about and that they can easily look up on the internet.

    I have more links to general English websites that I have put together that I post here as well.

    PS 16 December. This journalist for the 'New Statesman' visited several of the same places as me, a few weeks earlier. Dominic HInde.

    http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2014/09/im-only-yes-village-speaking-swing-voters-and-activists-scottish-borders

    "I'm the only Yes in the village": speaking to swing voters and activists in the Scottish Borders

    'Along the Anglo-Scottish border from Dumfries to Berwick, activists and swing voters give their opinions on the Scottish independence question.'

    He visited Dumfries, and Gretna, and also the town of Langholm that I wanted to visit (I used to know it) but ran out of time to get there. 2/09/14.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    31.5 KiB text or word processing document

    Talk on Plain English to the Foreign Philology in the 21st Century conference, 17 October 2014.

    7 things about the Plain English Campaign.

    I am going to tell you 7 quick things about the Plain English Campaign.

    The Plain English campaign does "exactly what it says on the tin". It is a campaign to get government officials, and companies, bureaucratic organisations, to use ordinary everyday simple English that ordinary people can understand, instead of complex bureaucratic language and jargon.

    There are lots of good resources on the Plain English Campaign website and I recommend that as a place to start.

  • Document: Dec 14, 2014
    53.5 KiB text or word processing document

    What I am going to do today.

    What I am going to do today is give you a very short introduction to how the English criminal justice system is organised.

    I will mention the role of the courts, the police and the prosecution.

    I will then talk about what I am interested in - criminal law.

    I will briefly identify problems that we have with our definitions of important definitional elements of criminal offences.

    And I will mention examples of problems of defining elements of some specific offences. So I am going to talk to you about the same things I would talk to my students of criminal law at home about.

    Finally I am going to ask you questions about these legal definitions. How you define in Ukrainian criminal law the key elements of offences, or what conduct (what behaviour) is included in some types of crime.

    The talk did not originally include the diagram of the English Court System that I intended to include due to the intermittent problems with internet access. I said instead that "students can always spend a few minutes on the internet and look up a diagram of the UK court system on Her Majesty's Court Service website." That would have been fruitless as the UK government webpages no longer include such a diagram on the court pages. I have included my copy of it here.

    On the day I did not actually deliver a talk but rather discussed a few issues with the students following questions. Some of those concerned my background and the legal points in the first three pages of this paper. We did not discuss the legal detail in the next two pages and the law students and psychology students may be interested in this. This basic explanation will also be of interest to students of the Faculty of Foreign Languages who are learning about the English legal system and the Common Law system.